Archive | July 29, 2017

Early History Of Canadian Satellite Tv

Canada is geographically the second largest country in the world, with its population of 30 million scattered throughout a vast northern wilderness. Although the majority of its citizens live within 150 miles of the US/Canada border, many others live in small isolated communities, out of range of the manor Canadian broadcast services. Early on the Canadian government realized the immense contribution that satellite technology could make in uniting its diverse population. In 1969, the Canadian Parliament created the Telesat organization, an all-Canadian company charged with the task of bringing into existence the worlds first domestic telecommunications system using geosynchronous satellites.

Between 1972 and 1975, Canadas Telesat organization make satellite history with the launch of the worlds first domestic telecommunications satellites. ANIK satellites, names after the Canadian Inuit Indian word for little brother, transmitted the first television and broadcast radio programs into previously isolated regions of Canada and Alaska. In 1978, Canada once again made satellite history by launching the worlds first bird capable of operating on 12 as well as 4 GHz frequencies. Experiments conducted through ANIK B demonstrated the practicality of the small dish antenna for direct satellite reception and provided the worlds first first commercial 12-GHz TV service.

In 1982, Telesat deployed ANIK D1, Canadas first 24 transponder satellite. The countrys second 12 GHz satellite, ANIK C3, was also launched from the space shuttle Columbia. In 1983, ANIK became operational; this satellite was temporarily leased to the American0based USCI corporation for Americas first Ku band DBS service.

So what are ANIK C3 satellites? With four primary spot beams and 16 transponders in the 12 GHz band, each of which can carry two video signals, ANIK C series satellites are in a prime position to deliver powerful regional TV signals not only to Canada, but to most of the United States as well. ANIK C3 was used for delivering cable TV services to Canadian cable TV operators; eventually the bird was able to carry some video for the private earth station owner. ANIK C2 was released by USCI to deliver five channels of subscription television programming into small sized dishes in the Northeastern US. USCI moved onto an American GSTAR satellite late 1984, on the bird was up and running. ANIK C2 then reverted to use by Canadian companies.

The Many Uses Of Thermal Night Vision Technology

Thermal night vision makes use of temperature to spot a person, animal, or object. This tool detects heat and produces images that reflect the placement of that heat. Most often incorporated into night vision goggles, the technology is used by law enforcement officers and hunters. Though less common, thermal night vision is also being incorporated into video cameras for better night shots. Another place one might find thermal imaging is in detecting mold or poor insulation.

Thermal imaging, especially in the use of night vision goggles, allows a person to see another being without being seen. Unlike older versions of the technology or using flashlights, the light is not visible to the other party. Current gear is also much lighter than previous models.

Law enforcement officers might use thermal night vision to tail a fugitive or investigate the scene of an accident. Often the technology is attached to law enforcement vehicles. This equipment shows heat images from a distance, so long before a vehicle is apprehended; an officer can see the make and model of a car. Military personnel and firefighters also use the technology for their duties.

Thermal night vision is used for security cameras. Security cameras with thermal imaging technology can detect activity in any area, even if it is not well lit. Many security systems come with a simple, wireless set-up and are low cost.

Photographers and videographers also make use of thermal night vision. Photographers use it to take digital SLR images under low light or even during the darkest time of night. Movie directors also use this technology to film night scenes.

Thermal night vision is useful for construction workers and home inspectors. Since thermal night vision products detect heat they can also spot places where there is not enough heat. That helps a person see if the insulation in a building has worn down or is missing. It can also detect radiation leaks.

The same technology aids workers in detecting the potential for moisture and mold problems. If there is a vast difference between the temperature inside and the temperature outside, it can create moisture problems. Inspectors can use thermal imaging to compare the temperatures inside and outside a home, spotting and potentially preventing mold and mildew problems.

Uses for thermal night vision abound. Some common uses are law enforcement, mold detection, photography, and security. It is also used in hunting, particularly in the use of thermal night vision goggles. The technology works by detecting heat and projecting images from the data. In law enforcement, it can be used to catch suspected criminals.