Archive | April 29, 2017

Is technology making social anxiety worse

I love video games, I love my computer, and I love my flat screen, but I find myself wondering sometimes if technology is making social anxiety worse. Has the convenience that technology has given to us also hindered us from overcoming social anxiety as a whole? Has technology made overcoming social anxiety even more difficult by placing a virtual barrier between human interaction and physical contact?

We can research and make friends with people online, but there is a lack of human interaction. The advantage of being online is that you can find a community to help you with whatever problem you have, but the disadvantage is the lack of action. We start using the internet as our outlet to being social. There is a huge lack of “real” interaction. We can sit at home and keep ourselves entertained with the hundreds of channels we have. We can live our vicariously through the character we play on video games, hell we can even pay our bills online so we don’t have to interact with another human being.

I love the benefits that are given to us because of technology, don’t get me wrong. I think it’s great that I can do everything I listed above. I love the fact that I can save time and money by sitting at home. I think technology can help and hurt you at the same time.

The way that I figure it, technology is like a fine wine. Doctors say, for the time being anyway, that a glass of wine a day is good for you. On the other hand, If you drink too much, it can kill brain cells and also can cause liver problems. Technology, like wine, can affect your relationships if you take in too much of it and let it control your life.

I think it’s outstanding that I have friends from all over the world that I’ve never met and probably never will, but I think it can also stunt your growth when it comes to getting past the reality of shyness and social anxiety. I realize that technology is a tool we can use to reach out to others but we need to use it wisely and apply what we learn with it, to the outside world. We have to make sure we don’t use technology as a crutch to avoid physical social interaction.

Usenet A Old Technology Made New

The plethora of sites dedicated to the Usenet system reveal that it is still very much alive. In fact, with the growing popularity of P2Ppeer to peerfile sharing, Usenet has proven that its long-standing model of transferring files is still viable.

This method is preferable to torrenting and other technologies in several regards. There is no place where the debate between one technology and another is engaged with such passion as it is on the Internet, and Usenet has been the subject of a great many conversations of late.

Many of these conversations have to do with speed. Torrent protocols have proven that they can deliver large downloads at impressive speeds. However, it is not only the torrent protocol that can make this boast. Usenet manages the same high speeds via a very different protocol.

While the adherents of one protocol or another continue to take swipes at each others pet technology, most users find themselves using the Usenet system as a part of their entire Internet technology use. The debaters, in many cases, fail to see the forest for the trees, as every technology has its use, whether its old or new.

Usenet offers users a different way of using the web to interact with others, which has also made it part of the conversation where social networking is concerned. Though its proponents like to refer to social networking technologies as Web 2.0, the Usenet system has roots that extend far before there was even a Web 1.0.

This system has some of the best features of bulletin boardstext posts, fast downloads and very specific interest groupsand some of the best features of new technologies. Its users are just not going to give it up, and for many good reasons.

There are literally thousands of subjects among the Usenet newsgroups. Contrast this to the relatively few interests found on any given forum. A Usenet user can surf newsgroups very quickly, whereas a forum user has to create a separate account for every different forum. Social networking sites also come and go very quickly.

Usenet has been around for a very long time and the work that one puts into forging relationships via the newsgroups oftentimes pays off for many years. Oddly, much of the debate surrounding Usenet concerns whether this venerable technology still outdoes its modern peers. It does, in many cases.

Kitchen Cabinet Hardware Your Guide

If you are replacing your cabinets completely or just want to improve your kitchen in the simplest way, changing your cabinet hardware can update your kitchen and give it a different look. Changing you cabinet hardware can be a much quicker and cleaner way to improve your kitchen, in comparison with re-painting and changing your kitchen’s colour scheme. If you are going to perform a major overhaul of your kitchen, make sure you complete all painting and staining of your cabinets before installing your new decorative knobs.

Before buying new kitchen cabinet hardware, you need to take accurate measurement of everything, especially the location and spacing of the screws in the cabinets. While you want to limit any cabinet drilling, it’s also important to remeber how frustrating it can be to return things to a shop. If you are replacing hardware, it could be a good idea to take samples of your old hardware to the shop with you.

While there are a multitude of colours, finishes and styles available for cabinet hardware, it will come connected by a knob with a single screw, with two screws or as a handle. In some cases, you might not have the choice between the two. If you already have pulls, changing to knobs would mean having to patch up or refinish the old holes left by the original hardware. If you are replacing handles, pay attention to the size of the placement of the holes, not the length of the handle. Measure from the centre of one hole to the centre of the other. Knobs and handles typically come with screws for using with inch thick material.

It looks best to have all of your hardware in the same style, so try to buy everything from the same company so it all has the same look. If you want different styles of hardware, make sure it matches in some way, in either finish or theme. Generally speaking, elegant and sophisticated kitchens use handles and cabinet knobs go brilliantly with a kitchen that is country-themed. Traditional kitchens look great with dull or matte finished metal in stainless steel, nickel, pewter or brass.

You could also match your choice to the room’s use. In bathrooms, choose knobs with durable finishes that will not tarnish with high humidity exposure. Think about cleaning as well, for example the kitchen or bathroom is not the ideal spot for ornate knobs. Also consider how often you use your cabinets or doors. If the hardware has some kind of catch or latch system, even though it may look appealing, it could become irritating after a few days.

Make sure you head to the store with colour swatches and paint samples of your cabinets and room along with old knobs, door handles and screws plus the size measurements so you know that you’ll be able to get a perfect match for what you want.